Cory Fuhr



Self-schooled and trained, Cory Fuhr sculpts exclusively in steel. His process includes arc-welding, manual cold manipulation and thermal folding.

"Anthropomorphic transformations have fascinated and inspired my work through my life. The fusion of the inanimate - cold metals - and the animated - our bodies and pastoral surroundings, drives my creative process.

By deconstructing those classicist notions that demand the separation of this mortal coil and the abstract, I strive to bring romance and breath to metal. The conflict of engineered forms and untouched landscapes challenges humanity to reconcile our organic form with the monstrous artifice of our creations. Through my work, I explore a possibility of acceptance, or reconciliation."



Biography

Canadian artist Cory Fuhr’s steel sculptures have been gaining momentum since his gallery debut in 2001, making their way into collections throughout North America.  From intimate representations of musical instruments to life size human forms, his work shows both depth and strength.  

Anthropomorphic transformations have fascinated and inspired my work through my life. The fusion of inanimate cold metals and the animated, our bodies and pastoral surroundings, drives my creative process.”  

Cory Fuhr lives in the countryside of interior British Columbia, his natural surroundings a stark contrast to his creations.  Fuhr¹s studio is a converted barn originally built by his grandfather where he works salvaged machine parts, gears and cables into new incarnations. His choice material and process reflect his fascination with industrialization and the engineering feats of humankind.  However, beyond the aesthetic lays the question of the cost of progress.

“The conflict of engineered forms and untouched landscapes challenges humanity to reconcile our organic form with the monstrous artifice of our creations. Through my work, I explore a possibility of acceptance, or reconciliation.”

In 2003, Fuhr was commissioned to create the piece “Couldn’t Sleep” that was presented to Jack Rabinovitch to commemorate the 10th Anniversary of the Giller Prize for Canadian Literature.  The life-size 300-pound steel sculpture of a male author working at a vintage typewriter, typifies the dynamism of the artist's work. Fuhr's construction fuses a post-modern sensibility with classical form and expression, juxtaposing the anachronistic typewriter with a futuristic medium and composition.

Alluring in their burnished refinements, Cory Fuhr’s new sculpture series, Classical Fusion, further explores humanity and its complex relationship with technology.